Flyaway Inlays 
installation, 2011/12
double-sided framed map, seven frames with photographic images on wooden shelves, backlit magic lantern slide
dimensions variable
Flyaway Inlays  Flyaway Inlays  Flyaway Inlays  Flyaway Inlays  Flyaway Inlays  Flyaway Inlays  Flyaway Inlays  Flyaway Inlays  Flyaway Inlays 

Looking at a map extracted from an atlas by a british publisher dating back to the year 1914 on which one identifies disparate and remote places, my interest was attracted by an apparent lack of a common thread connecting the mapped countries and cities. The inconsistent scale along with the assumable absence of an accordance on a geopolitical level tend to make the depicted seem rather like patched together to fit within the given layout of the paper. At the same time this implied discrepancy in the classification of the charted territories provided the space for a diversity in the reading of a document. How can the cartographic simulacra of locations, whose taxonomy and arrangement on an atlas page seem inexplicable, be visualized anew? How can one perceive images beyond the off of the frame and its circumscribed content by tracing back and partially rephrasing a broader narrative to which they formerly belonged? From each of these regions I searched for a postcard from the same period as the map, trying to avoid imagery of touristic commonplaces but rather look for unfamiliar, less "consumed" reproductions. Wish was thereby an invite to a closer inspection, a second sight on seemingly mundane representations.